MiaBella, LLC

Regression Slope with Two Explanatory Variables

Plots are crucial in evaluating regression results. This graph uses an interactive three-dimensional scene to assist the otherwise difficult task of visualizing the effect of two explanatory variables.

Instructions:

  • Move the mouse pointer to rotate the scene.
  • Press the space bar and click on a point to select it.
  • Scroll the mouse wheel to zoom.
  • Click and drag the mouse to change the size of the regression plane.
  • Click once for a new simulation. This also starts and stops the automatic rotation.
  • Double click to move to the next chart.

S&P 500 Volatility (January 1998 to March 2013)

Market volatility is usually plotted with one data point per time period. This chart expands the volatility measure into an entire distribution to show the full range of expected outcomes.

Instructions:

  • Move the mouse pointer to rotate the scene.
  • Scroll the mouse wheel to adjust the opacity of the graph.
  • Click once to start and stop the automatic rotation.
  • Double click to move to the next chart.

Average Growth by Country: 1961-1990 vs. 1991-2012

Many charts contain too much data to be readable. Often the solution is to plot less information. This chart uses an adjustable magnifier to display information that would otherwise be difficult to read. (Data from the World Bank Group.)

Instructions:

  • Move the mouse pointer to change the area of focus.
  • Scroll the mouse wheel to adjust the magnification.
  • Click and drag the mouse to change the viewport size.
  • Double click to move to the next chart.

Cross-Sectional Random Walks

Random walk simulations are a staple of financial analysis. This chart plots random time series in three dimensions.

Instructions:

  • Move the mouse pointer to rotate the scene.
  • Scroll the mouse wheel to highlight individual time series.
  • Click once for a new simulation. This also starts and stops the automatic rotation.
  • Double click to move to the next chart.

Network Graph

Network graphs are becoming increasingly important to map relationships in an interconnected world. However, these charts are notoriously difficult to read and interpret. This graph uses interactive shading to highlight relationships.

Instructions:

  • Move the mouse pointer over a node to see its primary connections in yellow and its secondary connections in purple.
  • Scroll the mouse wheel to adjust the line thickness.
  • Click and drag the mouse to change the arc of the network lines.
  • Click on the graph for a new simulation.
  • Double click to move to the next chart.

Response Surface of Regression with Three Explanatory Variables

It is extremely difficult to visualize regressions with three independent variables since the response surface is a solid cube. This graph focuses on specific areas with high predicted values (green), low values (red), and intermediate values (blue).

This graph makes it easier to spot exceptional results even in complicated nonlinear relationships.

Instructions:

  • Move the mouse pointer to rotate the scene.
  • Scroll the mouse wheel to alternate between high predicted values (green) and low predicted values (red).
  • Click and drag the mouse to change the level of detail.
  • Click on the graph for a new simulation. This also starts and stops the animation.
  • Double click to move to the next chart.

Global Accessibility Map

The European Commission's Global Environment Monitoring Unit and the World Bank's Development Research Group published a map of travel accessibility for the 2009 World Development Report. This graph applies an interactive zoom feature to the map to focus in on areas of interest.

The graph shows areas of high () medium () and low () accessibility. It also displays common shipping lanes (——).

Instructions:

  • Move the mouse pointer to change the area of focus.
  • Scroll the mouse wheel to adjust the magnification.
  • Click and drag the mouse to change the viewport size.
  • Double click to move to the next chart.

Global Accessibility Map: Copyright © European Union 2010.

About these Graphs

These interactive scenes are written in JavaScript® and WebGL. WebGL is an advanced graphics library maintained by the nonprofit Khronos Group.

By the end of 2013, all major desktop browsers—and an increasing number of mobile browsers—supported WebGL. This means that complex visualizations can be published to a worldwide audience from any web site.

MiaBella, LLC • miabella.llc.apps@gmail.com